Vitamin E: Anti-Aging Nutrients

Vitamin E can help anti-aging and fights internal aging damage, particularly in the brain. A report in the May 22, 2009 edition of “Scientific World Journal” explains that supplementing with vitamin E beginning in middle age, along with exercise, can help prevent the onset of cognitive decline and dementia associated with aging and help prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

Multi Vitamin for Men ReviewVitamin E helps with your body’s immune functions and can help prevent or slow disease. It can also limit the effects of free-radicals through its antioxidant properties and increase blood flow, helping to refresh skin cells.

Vitamin E acts as an antioxidant, helping to fight cellular aging and works in conjunction with vitamin C. When vitamin E is used with vitamin C, the aging benefits to skin are increased as the two help rebuild collagen. Vitamin C also helps revive damaged vitamin E.

Exercise speeds up metabolism which in turn beefs up the generation of free radicals. Consequently, the more one exercises, the greater the need for vitamin E. Because it’s fat soluble, vitamin E affords longer lasting protection for athletes as demonstrated among a group of professional basketball players. Twenty-four players were divided into two groups. One group received an antioxidant supplement containing vitamin E, and the other group were given a placebo. After one month of supplementation, the supplemented athletes had a 32 percent increase in vitamin E concentration, while the placebo group had a 7.3 percent reduction in vitamin E. Even “weekend warriors” can benefit from daily supplementation of 100 to 400 IU of vitamin E.

Vitamin E, more than any other vitamin, is associated with anti-aging and age-related conditions. As one ages, levels of vitamin E decline just as other antioxidant defenses break down. It comes as no surprise then, that aging conditions such as cognitive decline, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, cataract, and cancer may be reduced by supplementation with vitamin E.

A 7-year study of 2,889 patients at the Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago showed that those who had high vitamin E intakes from diet and supplements had 36 percent less decline in cognitive function than those whose vitamin E intake was low.

In the double-blind Cambridge Heart Antioxidant Study over 2,000 patients with coronary artery disease received a placebo pill or 400 IU or 800 IU of vitamin E daily. Truly remarkable results showed those who took either dose of the vitamin E reduced their risk of nonfatal heart attack by 77% over one year compared to the placebo group.

Because antioxidants need to recharge and support each other, always take vitamin E with other antioxidants.